Some fish

Mar. 22nd, 2017 11:32 am
izard: (Default)
Most of the corals are dead, but there is still some life.

Mooray eels, turtles, snorkelers, big groupers:
Read more... )
Full album link.
izard: (Default)
The weather was terrible and I caught cold, so I was only able to go freediving 3 times during last week in Pula.

Ppl were having fun. I was just passing this place on my way to reefs and caves.
Read more... )
All pics are in the album, not many this time.
izard: (Default)
Still I was a bit disappointed:

In the Red Sea, even in Eilat, there is more diversity in coral species. Even more so in Indonesia.

More fish and the most dangerous animal in the sea are under cut.
Read more... )
All pics are in the album
izard: (Default)
Most reviews of our hotel I read on tripadvisor indicated "bad snorkelling". Let's see...

This unicornfish and a small shark swam just ~30 meters from our room door. (20 meters to the shore, then 10 meters towards the reef). But there was a small trick.. I actually chased these two buddies towards the coast from deeper waters :)

Some more sea life under cut.
Read more... )
izard: (Default)
At work, debugging stuff I just developed. Dreaming of a tuna sandwich

and a vending machine only sells chocolate and cheese sandwich. I think on a pic is a shoal of tuna swimming next to me. Or is it mackerel?
izard: (Default)
The last post with underwater photos from my recent vacation. This time it is about people, not fish.


Read more... )
izard: (Default)
This time I failed to find any interesting creatures in the sea - no turtles, no stingrays. So I was mostly taking pictures of simply fish in coral reefs.

Actually not only very simple fish, there was a crocodile fish, roaming mooray eel, snake eel, and a lot of tropical fish - surgeons, groupers, clown fish pairs with their anemone, parrotfish, cleaner wraths and bigger wraths.

Some more pics under cut.
Read more... )
All pics are in a picasa album
izard: (Default)
This time we were not able to spend as much time in the sea as we usually do. But Yulia told me that this time I can post her picture in lj/facebook.

Only the picture has to be that small :)
And I have no size constraints:
Read more... )

Eilat

May. 7th, 2015 06:49 am
izard: (Default)
I am in Eilat, our first trip with our small baby. He likes the sea :)

Me too.

Can you see a big fish on this pic? Hint:
Read more... )
izard: (Default)
I still manage to do some freediving training once a week in the pool, but can't plan for any trips anytime soon.

So have to look at my old pics.

I was diving to this company many times, but I did not find out why they all gathered at a boring sand spot. They are all from different families/species with different food preferences, and they were all looking for something.
izard: (Default)
The best time to see stuff in a busy is early morning. Water is usually very calm, and animals are not scared away by hordes of intro-divers.

Unfortunately, the light just after a sunrise is not good for making photos under the water.
Read more... )
Location: https://www.google.com/maps/@29.5091848,34.9235322,197m/data=!3m1!1e3
izard: (Default)
During this holiday seasons several of my colleagues will go diving to warmer waters. I would like to go somewhere too, but this time I have to skip. So all I can do now is to whine how diving sucks.

80% of the divers I see when I free dive look miserable.

They are either doing intro/discovery diving with an instructor like this un-sporty gentleman on the right,

Or getting their first OWD certificate,
Read more... )

Or they are training to use a sign language,
Read more... )

Or aware fish ID course
Read more... )

Another thing where diving sucks is if a diving spot is far from an entry, and a boat is not available. Swimming on the surface with a scuba is not very pleasant especially when waters are not calm. Swimming beyond the surface will consume all the air in the tank before you get to the spot. Also for a freediver getting through a rocky entry or high surf is much easier.
Read more... )
For example, this picture just cannot be taken by a diver :)
izard: (Default)
Much like in a healthy coral forest, fish is abundant in a kelp forest.

Garibaldi fish is smiling and watching me. Garibaldis are the least cautious and friendliest fish out there.

The most common is perch
Read more... )

I don't know why the sharks roam on a sand bank and do not approach kelp forests
Read more... )
where there is more fish.

A school of bigger fish.
Read more... )

And smaller.
Read more... )

And the biggest.
Read more... )

Read more... )
A starfish.

All my pics from Malaga cove and Bluff cove dives last weekend are in a picasa album
izard: (Default)
When freediving, one has to move the limbs slowly and placidly to conserve oxygen in the muscles.

It is even more important when flying through a kelp forest - or else it is easy to get entangled. Just in case, I was still setting aside ~30 seconds on every dive.

The colors are blue, all shades of green and red.
Read more... )
So it is more fun than in real forest (and I am a very big fan of walking in forests)

Tropical seas are the brightest of course, but kelp forests are not far behind.
Read more... )

Individual kelp plants are more sophisticated than most corals.
Read more... )
izard: (Default)
I am in LA until this Friday, attending a conference. This is the first time at this conference when my presentation was ready one month in advance (thanks a lot organizers!). So I had more time to prepare for a freediving trip I planned for this Sunday.

These days the waters of Pacific near LA are extremely calm:

The ocean waves are coming from south, so to make it even better I selected north facing beaches for our trip: Malaga cove and Bluff cove. Now I recommend Bluff cove, my experience shows that it is reasonably safe to ignore danger signs there.

In Bluff cove, there are two juvenile sharks (each about 1 meter long) hunting on a sand bank.

They were very afraid of me and it took me some time to take a picture where they are somewhat visible. Now I am processing other photos. I have a lot of time in early morning because of a jet lag :)
izard: (Default)
Are there any dangerous creatures that live in the reef in Eilat?

Yes there are, especially those that can use their poison on a diver. Fortunately, they are always clearly visible and stationary. (Either completely static like anemone or moving very slowly like this lion fish)
Read more... )

There are very poisonous sea snakes in tropical seas, but not in Eilat. This is not a sea snake. (I hope so)

It must be a snake eel. I am not a marine biologist, so I can't really tell a snake eel's mimicry from a real snake.

An adult bluespotted ribbontail ray was not afraid of me and did not try to fly away like his younger sibling did before.
Read more... )
Not surprisingly - it's tail is a potent weapon.

And bigger predator fish is only dangerous to smaller fish.
Read more... )
izard: (Default)
During these few days I found that swimming to the sea before 8AM pays off. Even on Friday, I was the first guy in the sea.

That white thing on the horizon is the famous underwater observatory.
Read more... )
There are many aquariums with sea turtles, sharks, rays, exotic fish, a poor octopus, etc there. The main attraction however are not the aquariums but a big underwater observatory. Their web site states that it is the oldest underwater onbservatory, and the windows are submerged to 6 meters. When I was taking the stairs down I had a feeling that the real depth is just 3 meters.

The views there are very good.
Read more... )
So I obviously wondered how it would look from outside? The only way to find out is to get there by the sea. One has to buy a pass to the nature reserve beach and swim 500 meters from there, or swim a kilometer from a public beach. I have chosen a cheaper option :)

That is how it looks from the sea:

Nothing too special as a coral, but could be a nice wreck :) When diving there, I felt like the depth was only about 3-4 meters.

Now I see how the fish feels like when it is being watched and photographed through the windows:
Read more... )
That lady with a white smartphone must have taken couple of pictures of me and fish.

The corals around are well nurtured.
Read more... )

The bubbles on the pictures above are coming from the divers, who are taking care of the reef.
Read more... )
And yes, these guys must release the octopus or at least get him a bigger cage!!!
izard: (Default)
This time it is not the most rich reef I've been too, but I have more encounters with interesting sea life than ever. This is because now I know the secret: Get There Early! (This secret is well known to all the fishermen, but I did not realize it applies to freediving).

So, I got a hawksbill sea turtle. (Critically endangered, so must be difficult to come by)

(now I'd like to meet a green sea turtle)

a baby stingray
Read more... )
It was the most difficult animal to stalk, such a coward!

A sea snake
Read more... )
or what is it? It was moving much faster than a trepang.

A barracuda
Read more... )

An anemona is guarded by two clownfish
Read more... )
Very common thing actually, a cleaner wrasse and an urchin come as a bonus.

An octopus
Read more... )
And by the way, the guys at Eilat underwater observatory should get their octopus a bigger aquarium!

Divers getting their useless certificates
Read more... )
And by the way that was the first time I've seen kids younger than 8 with aqualungs - is it even legal?

Strange tourists who cannot swim but keep trying,
Read more... )

And finally myself:
Read more... )

Octopus

Jul. 9th, 2013 10:27 am
izard: (Default)
I was trying to find an octopus on my every diving occasion. Finally I made it today. I went for a short dive before the breakfast, first time this year and met 2 or three octopuses.

First, I've noticed one slowly getting out of his hideout.
Read more... )

He was changing colors, and was doing all the stuff octopus is supposed to do.

First red.

It just takes a fraction of a second to turn to a stone.
Read more... )

Just few seconds before Julia had sprinted to me, another octopus approached this one and they fled to coral fields together
Read more... )
And once again, they changed color to blue.
izard: (Default)
Lacking the corals and most of colorful fish, the brightest spots underwater were starfish and some of the algae.

That is the brightest starfish I've seen, a pink one.

Read more... )

When free diving in tropical waters, I usually go down to 10 meters, stay there for about 10 seconds looking around and making pictures, and then slowly ascend to the water surface. Diving deeper is tempting but could be dangerous without a trained buddy. In Adriatic I went down to only about 6 meters and felt uncomfortable going deeper. Mainly it was because of a high water temperature gradient and partially because of light effects, it becomes dull
Page generated Jul. 25th, 2017 12:34 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios